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July 1980: Newsletter 6, lists a scope of the collection, an account of activities such as the "At Home" series, slide shows and fundraisers, and a beginning bibliography on Lesbians working together.

To make sure nobody could see the contents through the thin envelope, we added an extra cover, with simply the word "Newslette" on it. It was never our intent to "out" women by accidentally exposing the kind of material they received in the mail: respecting women's privacy has always been important to us. On the cover: a photograph of the Archives' contingent at the Gay Pride March, showing our large signs with faces of famous and not so famous lesbians.

In the newsletter: a guide to our collections including the second poetry update, special collections and a piece on issues of naming- a couple of paragraphs on how the term "women's" often muddles the issue. A quote: "So; no more eufemisms. Women's music is lesbian music. Women's culture is lesbian culture."



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December 1981: Newsletter 7, 45 pages! In this issue for the first time: In Memory of the Voices We Have Lost- a feature mentioning the names of lesbians who passed away. Often in obituaries the only reference to a woman's lesbian partner is a short mentioning of her "companion."

On the cover, and with an editorial, we feature Jeannette Foster, who had died that year. In this issue also a Bibliography of Sexuality, the continuing story of our funding, a wonderful piece on the "Gutter letter" and how some of our material manages to find us.

Also: Mabel Hampton's coming out story, and the Provincetown book Collection.



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Winter 1984: Newsletter 8, 44 photocopied pages, dedicated to the International collection. Our own copy is a xerox. This issue starts with many thank yous to contributors, volunteers and friends. The cover features a poster by Oikabeth Lesbianas Socialistas from Mexico. Our finances are discussed with an actual overview of the numbers for 1982 and 1983. Our budgets are amazingly low.

In this issue we start a cultural survey of "The Well of Loneliness"- Radcliffe Hall's novel which played such an important role in many lesbians' lives. Our goal is to collect information on how we see and judge our cultural roots.

We also publish a partial listing of our international collection, listed by country and ranging from Australia to the (then) USSR, and a few pieces about lesbian life from before the 70s.



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September 1986: Newsletter 9, 12 pages with a beautiful poster of two women and a fragment of Sappho's poetry. We produced a slimmer newsletter hoping that this would enable us to publish more frequently. But apparently the number of pages has nothing to do with it.

In this issue there is a sampling of the responses to "The Well of Loneliness" survey, a piece on Mabel Hampton, a message from the coordinating coordinators about recent changes. Space has already begun to be a major issue and this will only increase.



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February 1988: Newsletter 10. On the cover: Rota Silverstrini 1941-1987.

In this issue we bring you the story of Marge MacDonald, whose collection you can find at the Archives, and one of her diary entries, about a visit to a lesbian bar in Ohio, in 1955.

Also: the announcement of the Building Fund, our fundraisng effort for our own building, information on the DOB (Daughters of Bilitis) project, our slideshow, the "At Home" series and encouraging words to make a will and ensure that your wishes about your estate will be respected.

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